An offer of a FREE

Outlook Macro

Subrogate Subrogation

Legal Practice Management Software for Attorneys

Use of this macro is not limited to AutoSubrogate®

An attorney without Practice Management Software is like a mechanic without a wrench.

Saving an Outlook E-Mail message in a computer file like a document with its associated case file record.

AltTxt: E-Mail Yellow Sticky Green Push Pin

 

Executive Summary

 

This Outlook macro allows users to share the e-mail messages in their inbox with other users involved in a group effort to process a data-object such as a matter/case file record that commonly exists in law offices. It makes the process for doing that as simple as using the turn-signal in your car. This Outlook macro can be equally useful in any application in which multiple users contribute to a joint effort to process any kind of data-object. Use your imagination! The use of this macro in the legal instance is a very representative example that can be used as a model to extended its functionality to other applications.

This procedure is very long, but not complicated, because it provides very detailed instructions on how to install this Outlook macro on a Personal Computer (PC) by competent users of Microsoft Windows operating system (OS) versions: XP, Vista, Windows-7, or Windows-8. It is also assumed that Microsoft Outlook version 2007, 2010, or 2013 is installed on the PC and has been correctly configured to send and receive e-mail messages. Other Microsoft Office component software programs such as Word, Excel, Access, etc., etc. are not required.

Even though the person performing this procedure is assumed to be a competent user of Microsoft Windows, every minute detail of what they must do to complete the installation successfully is given as if they barely knew how to spell Windows. This procedure includes many illustrative images. Many users of MS-Windows have acquired some bad habits along the way. After completing this installation procedure, they will be cured of their bad habits.

If the Tsarnaev brothers Dumb and Dumber, as stupid as they were, can build an effective bomb with a timer or remote detonating device by reading the instructions off of an internet web page that was so effective at harming so many people at the Boston Marathon, then you can follow this step-by-step procedure and be successful at making this macro work for you and your law firm. Get started and make it happen. Like I have said elsewhere in this procedure; if you get stuck and are not making any progress, contact me. I will help you.

Qualifications for FREE assistance


In several places in this procedure and possibly in other places on this website, I make an offer of FREE assistance by just calling me at the telephone number provided. I now realize that given the number of people who are going to encounter this web-page on the internet, that there will not be enough of me to make good on all of those requests. I’ll be swamped and buried by the volume. I’ll have no time left to do anything else. So therefore I must limit my offer of FREE assistance to attorneys only or their bona fide representative. That means that, in order for me to provide you with FREE assistance, I must first know your name as it appears on your license to practice law, the state in which you are licensed to practice law, and the unique bar number that identifies you in your state. If you are an attorney in an English speaking country other than the United States of America, this offer of FREE assistance is good for you as well. I will need the equivalent information about you from the institution in your country that regulates who is qualified to practice law in your country. You may want to contact me by e-mail to setup a GoToMeeting secession over the internet to avoid the high cost of international telephone toll charges. Indeed, this is probably going to be a necessity for providing FREE assistance to anyone. By doing this I will be able to record these sessions of FREE assistance and make them available to everybody on my YouTube channel. Need I remind you that it is a very serious crime (probably a felony — I’m not an attorney) to misrepresent yourself as an attorney when you are not one.

If you are not an attorney and you need assistance to complete this procedure, I suggest you identify local information technology (IT) talent in your area that is qualified to provide you with IT consultation. Once they have read this procedure they should be able to provide you with the assistance you need at a reasonable cost. This procedure should not be a challenge to anyone who claims to be a qualified IT consultant.


Installation Procedure


This procedure has been tested and verified to work correctly with Microsoft Outlook versions 2007/2010/2013. If you encounter a problem that keeps you from completing this procedure successfully, please contact me. My contact information is below. I have GoToMeeting software which means that with your advanced knowledge and consent I can monitor what you are doing over the internet. If you don’t look good, I don’t look good. My professional passion in life is to create appliances that get people the information they need to do their work and minimizes the number of mental hoops they have to jump through to get it. Your success is my success. There is no charge for this assistance.

CAVEAT: I created this blog website with posts using Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE). If you are using a different web browser such as Safari, Chrome, or Firefox, you may have to make some adjustments to the instructions in this procedure. Your life will be much easier if you just go ahead and use IE.

I have revised this blog post by adding a YouTube video that illustrates for the reader how the smiley face icon is used to execute the macro. And the effect the macro has that will save attorneys a lot of time. This makes it possible for the reader to make an informed decision as to whether or not the content of this blog post will actually benefit them enough in their law practice to make reading the rest of this blog post a worth while investment of their time.

The part of this video that refers to the E-Mail macro runs from 4:03/12:48 (current view point / total run time as mm:ss) to 7:22/12:48. (That is 3 minutes 19 seconds.) So to watch only this part of the video and ignore the rest, start the video playing. (You may have to touch the tip of your mouse pointer to the video sub-window to get the play back controls to reappear.) Then, using the tip of your mouse pointer, grab (press left mouse button [LMB] down & hold it) the playback cursor on the progress bar and drag it to the desired playback point which is 4:03/12:48. Drop the playback cursor on the progress bar by releasing the LMB. Click on the play button (arrow pointing right) in the lower left corner. The video will resume playback. When the playback cursor gets to 7:22/12:48, click on the pause button in the lower left corner. If you want to replay a segment of the video, you can pause the video by just clicking (LMB) your mouse pointer anywhere inside of the video screen; grab the playback cursor and drag it back as far as what you want to replay. You probably don’t want to go too far. Restart the video again by just clicking (LMB) your mouse pointer anywhere inside of the video screen. When you are finished watching the video just pause it again. You can leave the video paused while you read the rest of the blog post. It will not hurt a thing. After you start the video, click the square in the lower right corner of the video sub-window. This will make the video sub-window explode to full screen. You will be able to see the content of the video much better this way. When you are finished watching the video. press the Esc(ape) key in the upper left most corner of your keyboard. This will shrink the video window back to a sub-window.

 

Click the “Play Button” to watch the video.

 

Attorneys have to deal with many kinds of documents: correspondence (letters, fax, e-mail), court pleadings, affidavits, depositions, data forms, reports just to name a few. Each instance of those kinds of documents refers to a specific case. So therefore the retrieval process should be limited to just those instances when searching for a case document. When it is not, the exhaustive enumeration method must be used to locate the document. This doesn’t have to be done very many times for you to come to the realization of how the “exhaustive enumeration method” got its name. It’s exhausting! Such is the case with e-mail. That is the only challenge I intend to deal with right now. How are we going to get an e-mail message associated with a case record, and make it available to all of your associates when the e-mail message is stored in your Outlook Inbox?

At your discretion (The image you are looking at may be big enough for you without using the one in a separate browser instance.) display the following image by right clicking it. In the popup menu that appears, click on “Open link in new window” to see the image full size. Resize the browser frame to your taste and don’t close it — keep it open. If the text is too small to read, zoom-in (Ctrl+) to make the text larger. Zoom-Out (Ctrl-) to make the text smaller. Print it (Ctrl-P) in portrait mode for a hardcopy if that is what you want.

 

AltTxt: Outlook 2010 Top Left Corner

Outlook Inspector Window — Top Left Corner

The above image shows the top left most corner of the Outlook Inspector screen; The one you read your e-mail message in when you double click it in the list of e-mails in your InBox. (Windows Rule #1: Single Click to Select; Double Click to Open. This is equally true for both list and non-list items. Remembering this can save you lots of grief later on.) Please notice the icons in the top most row in the top left most corner. They are labeled ‘1’ through ‘6’. Please notice icon ‘6’ is the upper half of a smiley face icon. That is what we are going to add to your QAT (Quick Access Tool bar). Behind it we are going to put a simple macro. I will provide it to you when you need it. When you click on the smiley face icon, the macro will run and popup a dialog box that will instruct you to enter the MyFile # of your case. If you identify your cases by name instead of by number, you will enter the name you have assigned to your case. The name will have to be spelled exactly as it was created. More about how to deal with this later.

 

AltTxt: The Dialog Box that pops up when you click on the smiley face icon.

The Dialog Box that pops up when you click on the smiley face icon.

You do not have to be a computer programmer to do this. But it will be easier if you are a competent user of Microsoft Windows. This will work for Microsoft Outlook 2007/2010/2013. There will be some security issues. But they’re not a show stopper.

MALWARE


If you are concerned about whether or not I am a hacker-cracker trying to trick you into installing malware on your computer, and you should be, please consider this. And don’t take my word for this. Verify it with someone you trust. I am instructing you on how to enter source code on your computer. I have been doing this kind of work for a long time, and I have never heard of malware being distributed in the form of source code. For one thing you have to at least install the source code in the right place, and in some cases you have to compile it before it will even execute. That is not very stealthy! In order for malware to do its harm it has to be able to function without you knowing about it. Unless you have a death wish for your computer, that is not going to happen.

Also, You are only copying source code for 2 functions. The 1st function is only 3 lines of code the first of which is “Begin” and the last is “End Sub”. So there is only one line of executable code. The 2nd function has 44 lines of source code. Without being a computer programmer you can read the source code and see what it is doing just like I can read a simple commercial contract without being an attorney and have a pretty complete idea of what its purpose and function is.

Saving an Outlook E-Mail message in a computer file like a document with its associated case file record.


In order to make this happen; i.e. make this macro work, there must exist a “well defined directory structure” on the C: drive of your PC, or on a drive letter on your PC that is mapped to a “well defined directory structure”, called a “share” by your network administrators, on your server. The “share” option makes it possible for multiple PC users in your law firm to access all the documents for all your case file records. This should not be an unreasonable requirement since most law firms have already created a “well defined directory structure” on a server. The need is common to all law firms and the solution is so obvious to anybody who knows how to use Microsoft Windows (file) Explorer to manage files on their hard disk(s). So for this solution, I am going to use the following “well defined directory structure” as an example.

AltTxt: Well Defined Directory Structure Upper Part

Well Defined Directory Structure Upper Part

At your discretion display the following image by right clicking it. In the popup menu that appears, click on “Open link in new window” to see the image full size. Resize the browser frame to your taste and don’t close it — keep it open. If the text is too small to read, zoom-in (Ctrl+) to make the text larger. Zoom-Out (Ctrl-) to make the text smaller. Print it (Ctrl-P) in portrait mode for a hardcopy if that is what you want.

AltTxt: Directory Structure in Practice Mgmt Software

Directory Structure in Practice Mgmt Software for the storage of all documents for a particular case (i.e., Lower Part)

This image of a well defined directory structure shows MyFile number (#) 24071 and all of its subfolders — all 34 of them. MyFile # 24071 is subordinate to folder “MyFiles” (shown above) along with hundreds or even hundreds of thousands of its peer MyFile # folders. Do not be concerned about the amount of hard disk space consumed by folders. They are like Styrofoam boxes — light as air. Folder “MyFiles” is subordinate to the “share” folder described above. This describes the entire well defined directory structure for all case file documents, of whatever kind, for your whole law firm.

Ok! Let’s Get Started!


Now that I have said what we are going to do, why we are going to do it, and described the component piece parts we are going to do it with; let’s make it happen; i.e. make this macro work..!!

As inconvenient as this may be, on your PC desktop close as many applications and browser tabs as you can. This installation process requires you to move around a lot between Windows application frames, and web browser tabs. The more application frames, and web browser tabs that you have open, that you are not using for this process, the more difficult you will be making it on yourself to find your way back to where you came from before applying a step’s tasks in the sequence of the instructions.

While using Windows (file) Explorer when the instructions in the procedure say “click the icon”, it means “CLICK THE ICON” not the label. You should always click the icon not the label unless you intend to change (rename) the instance of the object the icon represents. If you are imprecise while using your mouse, remember that the Esc(ape) key is your friend. I am trying to save you from yourself here. If you did what I do as much as I do it, you would understand why this is important. Also, don’t double click when the instructions say to click something; “click something” means single click the left mouse button (LMB). Only double click the LMB when the instructions say “double click“.

Screen shot images with small dense text are blurry and difficult to read. This process will make the image readable. Display the following image by right clicking it. In the popup menu that appears, click on “Open link in new window” to see the image full size. Resize the browser frame to your taste and don’t close it — keep it open. If the text is too small to read, zoom-in (Ctrl+) to make the text larger. Zoom-Out (Ctrl-) to make the text smaller. Print it (Ctrl-P) in Landscape mode for a hardcopy if that is what you want.

AltTxt: Screen Shot of VBA source code editor

Screen Shot of VBA source code editor

ASSUMPTIONS — This procedure assumes that:


1. You have already started the Microsoft Outlook 2007/2010/2013 program component of Microsoft Office or a stand alone version of Outlook that you have installed on your PC.
2. That your PC is running Microsoft Windows Vista/Windows-7/Windows-8 operating system (OS). Windows XP End-of-Life was April 8 2014 as announced by Microsoft in Windows update for patch Tuesday 2014-03-11. This procedure still worked when last tested in Windows XP OS. Just remember that you are living on borrowed time if you choose to do that.
3. And that the Outlook application frame is being displayed on your desktop with the “Inbox” folder selected.
4. That you have only one “Inbox” folder; Only one PST (Personal Storage Table) file; and Only one e-mail address. If you have more than one of any of these elements, the Save-E-Mail message as a MSG file will still work; but a little extra effort may be required. We’ll talk. Fear not; It won’t be that hard. You can continue following this procedure without risk of breaking anything.
5. As a knowledgeable user of Microsoft Windows you have experience using the following key stroke combinations and text selection techniques with your mouse and mouse pointer: You know how to select text (i.e. that the selected text is displayed in reverse video) in an application (you know what is meant by “a Windows application”) by placing the insertion cursor using your mouse pointer where it is needed to select a block of text then using your shift key in conjunction with the cursor motion keys to select the specified text; You know how to copy a block of selected text to your “clip board” (and you know what the “clip board” is) by using Ctrl-C; You know how to insert the contents of the “clip board” where it is needed by pressing Ctrl-V; You know that you can immediately press Ctrl-Z to undo what you just did if you are not satisfied with the result; And you know that when using an internet web browser, like you are doing right now, there is no insertion cursor so therefore to select text you must use your mouse (LMB – Left Mouse Button held down at the beginning of selection) and mouse pointer to carefully “swipe” over the text you want to select before using Ctrl-C to copy it to your “clip board”; And that when you copy selected text to the “clip board”, it overlays the previous contents of the “clip board” by replacing it with the current selected text. That sounds like a lot but I know that you can do it!

First Procedure (of 2); First Macro (of 2) — a very small one

1. Closely observe the tabs along the top edge of this instance of your web browser. The one you are using right now. Observe which tab is highlighted to stand out from the other tabs. You want to be sure to remember how this looks so that you can find your way back to your instructions after applying them in another application window. Now would be a good time for you to bookmark this URL in your web browser. Should you later decide that you want to return to this web page.

2. With the MS-Outlook application frame active; i.e. it has the focus (click the title bar if necessary), press key combination alt-F11. Outlook 2010/2013 users may have to click on the “Developer” tab above their ribbon. Then click on the “Visual Basic” icon, left most on the ribbon, to have the same effect. The VBA Editor opens “Microsoft Visual Basic – VbaProject.OTM”.

3. In the Left Side Bar, right click “ThisOutlookSecession”. If “ThisOutlookSecession” is not visible, click on the ‘+’ plus signs till it is visible.

4. In the popup menu, left click “View Code”. The “VbaProject.OTM – ThisOutlookSecession (Code)” subWindow (pane) opens in the client area of the VBA Editor. As necessary resize the window pane to make it bigger. But don’t go full screen.

5. Copy and paste the following 3 lines of VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) Macro script into the main body of “VbaProject.OTM – ThisOutlookSecession (Code)” by selecting all 3 lines of code, minus the plus signs, using the mouse pointer (swipe it) with the left mouse button pressed and held down. Then press Ctrl-C. Left click the mouse pointer anywhere inside the subWindow pane in the VBA Editor client area. Then press Ctrl-V.

+++++++++++++++
Private Sub Application_Startup()
MsgBox “Macros should be enabled now.”
End Sub
+++++++++++++++

6. Edit the Application_Startup() script by replacing the two double quotes in the MsgBox statement with double quotes you type on your keyboard. What is there now was italicized by the blog software. Single and double quotes and spaces are among the many sources of extra pain endured by programmers. Without this change you would get a syntax error when the line of code is executed.

7. Now that you have “written” your first Microsoft (MS) Outlook macro, save it by pressing Ctrl-S (with the MS-Outlook VBA Editor application frame active [has focus] — Click the title bar if needed). Keep this VBA Editor application frame open. You will need it again later. You can minimize it to the task bar to get it out of the way if you want to. But please do not close it.

Second Procedure (of 2); Second Macro (of 2) — a slightly bigger one. Trust me. This is not BIG by a long shot.


OK! One macro down and one more to go. The purpose of the first macro Application_Startup() is to trigger Outlook, during its startup sequence, into poping up its “Microsoft Outlook Security Notice” that says “Microsoft Office has identified a potential security concern.” Try not to have an anxiety attack about Microsoft’s “potential security concern”. That is what inspired them to create the ever popular Windows Vista operating system (OS). Microsoft has been acting like a dog that has been beat too much ever since. This gives us an opportunity to click on the command button “Enable Macros”. That way we can execute the macro that saves an e-mail message to a MSG computer file when we click on the smiley face icon that we are going to add to the QAT (Quick Access Tool bar). But first we have to get the second of two macros installed and working named SaveAsEmail2AutoSubrogate().

1. With the MS-Outlook VBA Editor application frame active; i.e. it has the focus (click the title bar if necessary),

2 In the Left Side Bar, right click the icon labeled “Project1(VbaProject.OTM)”. A popup menu will appear. Hover your mouse pointer over the menu choice “Insert” (it has an arrow head pointing to the right). A submenu appears. If a submenu doesn’t appear, click “Insert”. Click on “Module”. A new module subWindow (pane) opens with “VbaProject.OTM – Module1 (Code)” in the title bar. As necessary resize the window pane to make it bigger. But don’t go full screen.

3. Get the Outlook Macro source code on your clip-board by
clicking here

4. Paste the code (Ctrl-V) into the VbaProject.OTM – Module1 (Code) open subWindow pane (You may have to click inside the subWindow pane first to move the “focus” there).

5. Save your work by pressing Ctrl-S.

Now we are going to edit the VBA subroutine SaveAsEmail2AutoSubrogate()


(Skip this bullet item list for now. You can return to it if you need it.)
If at anytime while editing SaveAsEmail2AutoSubrogate() you feel that you have made a complete mess of everything and want to start over again with a fresh copy of SaveAsEmail2AutoSubrogate(), do the followig:

  • Left Click your mouse pointer anywhere inside the VBA source code editor window pane to be sure that is where the focus is.
  • Press Ctrl-A to select all text in the window pane.
  • Optionally press Ctrl-C to copy selected content to the clipboard.
  • If you took the Ctrl-C option, open an instance of the Windows Notepad program and paste the content of the clipboard [Ctrl-V] into Windows Notepad so that you can go back to see and possibly reuse some of what you typed. Return to the VBA Editor window pane (click anywhere inside it) and re-select all the text [Ctrl-A].
  • Press the “Delete” key to delete all source code in the window pane.
  • Go back and get another copy of SaveAsEmail2AutoSubrogate() using the process described above that began at “clicking here”.
  • Resume the current procedure.

 

To make it easier to work with the Project code editor, close the “Project – Project1” left side bar by clicking on the ‘X’ in the upper right corner of the left side bar. If you ever feel like you need to restore it so you can see it again, you may do so by pressing Ctrl-R or by clicking “View” main menu item then clicking sub-menu item “Project Explorer”.

The 10th line (#) down in you VBA Editor “VbaProject.OTM – Module1 (Code)” sub-menu pane should be:

gs_MMSaveAsDrive = “C:” ‘<– Change to ‘C’ for local machine or drive letter mapped to a ‘Share on server’.

This is where you set the drive letter to tell the macro where your “well defined directory structure” is located. If the directory structure where you store all your case file documents for your law firm is on your ‘C:’ drive, then you don’t need to change this value. ‘C:’ is the default value. If the directory structure where you store all your case file documents for your law firm is on a “share” on a server, then you must have a drive letter mapped to that “share” on your local machine (PC). Ask your network administrator what that drive letter is. Or you can find it yourself using Microsoft Windows (file) Explorer. Once you know what that mapped drive letter is, then you must set gs_MMSaveAsDrive equal to that value.

Look at the row of icons just below the main menu on your VBA Editor. This is called the “Tool Bar”. On the far right end of the tool bar you should see “Ln 10, Col 1“. That is the position of your insertion cursor in the code editor. Assuming you moved the insertion cursor to the line number (#) discussed above. You can press the cursor down key and watch the Ln value change as the insertion cursor moves down. Use this technique to find any line number you want in the VBA Editor.

The 31st line down in you VBA Editor “VbaProject.OTM – Module1 (Code)” pane should be:

objItem.SaveAs gs_MMSaveAsDrive & “\AutoSubrogate — The Share folder\AutoSubrogate\MyFiles\” & strMyFileNmbr & “\E-Mails\” & strMyFileName, olMSG

Compare what you see on line # 31 to what you see in the “Well Defined Directory Structure Upper Part” plus what you see in “Directory Structure in Practice Mgmt Software Lower Part for the storage of all documents for a particular case” image that you left open in a separate web browser instance much earlier in this discussion. Please take note that what is on line # 31 corresponds exactly to what is shown in the two images. I have been very careful to make sure that is true. This will reveal to you how to edit line # 31 above. The character strings between the back_slashes are folders (subdirectories) on the above described “drive letter”. strMyFileName will be the name of your MSG file as determined by the program statement on line # 20. You must edit line # 31 so that it matches the directory structure on YOUR ‘C:’ drive or whatever mapped drive letter points to a “share” on YOUR server. Line # 31 tells the macro where to put the MSG file created by Outlook when you click the smiley face icon. Use the combined two images stated above as a model to interpret YOUR specific “path” of subdirectories (folders) from the “drive letter” to the “E-Mails” folder where the MSG file is to be saved. Be sure to save your work (Ctrl-S) when you are finished.

Now the final change that we are going to make in the macro editing process is to set a reference in your VBA Editor “VbaProject.OTM – Module1 (Code)”. In the main menu at the top of your editor window frame, click on menu choice “Tools”. At the top of the drop-down list that appears, click on sub-menu choice “References…”. Scroll down the list of “Available References” by “grabbing” (Left Mouse Button [LMB] pressed and held down) the “thumb” in the scroll bar along the right edge of the drop-down window pane or use the down-arrow button at the bottom of the scroll bar (leave the Priority arrows alone) till you see the list item named “Microsoft Internet Controls”. Select it by single left clicking in the check-box to the left of the list item named “Microsoft Internet Controls”. Be sure that there is a check mark in the check-box when you are done. Click on the “OK” button in the upper right corner of the “References Project1” sub-window. The “References Project1” sub-window disappears.

Now save your work by pressing Ctrl-S and click on the floppy disk icon (third from the left) on the Tool Bar. Close the VBA Editor “VbaProject.OTM – Module1 (Code)” window frame by clicking on the red ‘X’ in the upper most right hand corner

CAVEAT


Your “well defined directory structure” is said to be “well defined” because the Outlook Macro expects it to be logically consistent throughout; i.e., The “path” from the “drive letter” to the final subdirectory folder “E-Mails” is the same except for the MyFile #. The MyFile # and the file names stored in the folders of the “well defined directory structure” are the only things that vary from one case file to the next. If that is not true, your Outlook Macro is not going to work correctly. That means you can’t make up special little thingies, except in the file names (taken from the subject line — You can edit the subject line. Click the floppy disk icon in the QAT to save your changes before you click the smiley face icon. Keep it short.), that help you remember stuff. That is what you have a computer for.

Add Smiley Face Icon to QAT (Quick Access Toolbar)


At your discretion display the following image by selecting (changing the focus to) the separate web browser instance that we previously created near the beginning of this procedure. Resize the browser frame to your taste and don’t close it — keep it open. If the text is too small to read, zoom-in (Ctrl+) to make the text larger. Zoom-Out (Ctrl-) to make the text smaller. Print it (Ctrl-P) in portrait mode for a hardcopy if that is what you want.

AltTxt: Outlook 2010 Top Left Corner

Outlook Inspector Window — Top Left Corner

The above image shows the top left most corner of the Outlook Inspector screen; The one you read your e-mail message in when you double click it in the list of e-mails in your InBox. Please notice the icons in the top most row in the top left most corner. They are labeled ‘1’ through ‘6’. Please notice icon ‘6’ is the upper half of a smiley face icon. That is what we are going to add to your QAT (Quick Access Tool bar). When you click on the smiley face icon, the “SaveAsEmail2AutoSubrogate()” macro, that we just finished installing, will run and popup a dialog box that will instruct you to enter the MyFile # of your case. If you identify your cases by name instead of by number, you will enter the name you have assigned to your case. The name will have to be spelled exactly as it was created. The name that you use to identify your case files as is used in the “well defined directory structure” must have no spaces in it; i.e., “John Smith” becomes “JohnSmith”. This is called “Camel Case” by some because the imbedded capital letters resemble the hump of a camel. Spaces are natural delimiters. As such they are a big head ache for computer programmers when used in identifiers of data. So therefore it is best not to use them. If you have named folders in your “well defined directory structure” with spaces, you will have to rename those folders by taking the spaces out of the names to use this macro.

1. Open any e-mail message in your “Inbox” by double clicking it.

2. In the open e-mail item window on the top most left part of the title bar, click the dropdown arrow on the right side of the QAT (Quick Access Tool bar). It’s very small. Expect to have to look close to see it.

3. The first item in the dropdown menu that appears is labeled “Customize Quick Access Toolbar”. Right click it. A shorter menu pops up.

4. The 1st item on the 2nd popup menu is labeled “Customize Quick Access Toolbar…” Left click it..

5. A main window, that is separate from the Outlook application frame (You can grab the title bar and yank the window around) appears. From the “Choose commands from” Drop-Down list (Click on the down arrow to make the list appear), select “Macros”.

6. Unless you have been writing macros yourself or acquired a macro(s), there will be only one macro listed in the box “SaveAsEmail2AutoSubrogate()”. Left click it to select it.

7. Left Click the “Add >>” button to move it from the box on the left to the box on the right. Leave the macro command last on the list in the box on the right.

8. Left click the macro command “SaveAsEmail2AutoSubrogate()” in the box on the right to select it.

9. Left click the Modify button just below the box on the right. A square dialog box with a bunch of icons appears. Left click the yellow smiley face icon (4th row down — last column on the right on my PC).

10. Below the box of icons but still in the dialog box, there is a small text box labeled “Display name”. Replace whatever you find in that box with the following text (Leave out the quotes): “Save As Email to Directory Structure”. Copy and paste worked good for me. You have done it enough times now that I shouldn’t have to tell you how. This short message will appear when you hover the mouse pointer over the smiley face icon once you are finished. At the bottom right corner of the “Modify Button” popup dialog box, click the OK button.

11. At the bottom right corner of the Outlook Options window, left click on the OK button.

12. Close the e-mail message that you opened in step # 1 by left clicking on the ‘X’ in the upper right most corner of the window frame.

13. In Outlook 2007 on the Main Menu bar, click “Tools”; On the drop-down menu that appears, click “Trust Center”;.In the “Trust Center” dialog box that appears in the left side bar click “Macro Security”; In the “Trust Center” dialog box main area there are 4 radio buttons; Click radio button “Warnings for all macros” In the lower right corner of the “Trust Center” dialog box, click the OK button.

14. In Outlook 2010/2013 click to select the “File” tab (upper left corner); In the left side bar click to select “Options”; The “Outlook Options” dialog opens; In the “Outlook Options” dialog left side bar, click to select “Trust Center”; In the “Outlook Options” dialog main area, there is a comand button labeled “Trust Center Settings”. Click it. The “Trust Center” dialog opens; In the “Trust Center” left side bar, click “Macro Settings”; In the “Trust Center” main area under subtitle “Macro Settings” there are 4 radio buttons; click to select radio button labeled “Notifications for all macros”. In the lower right corner of the “Trust Center” dialog box, click the OK button. In the lower right corner of the “Outlook Options” dialog box, click the OK button.

AltTxt: Microsoft Office Has Identified a Potential Security Concern

Microsoft Office Has Identified a Potential Security Concern

15. You are basically finished. But to make the whole thing work you must close Outlook, including any messages you may have open; then reopen it. When Outlook reopens this time it will display a dialog box, like the one above, with a message from Microsoft meant to scare the daylights out of you. Don’t be afraid. Click “Enable Macros” button, then move on.

Let’s Test Our Work


AltTxt: The Dialog Box that pops up when you click on the smiley face icon.

The Dialog Box that pops up when you click on the smiley face icon.



About the “delete warning” in the above dialog box. . . . This warning is provided in the interest of full disclosure about what will happen when you click the OK command button on this window dialog box. This should not be a concern for you because, when you click on “Reply” in Outlook as in almost all e-mail client software including web based e-mail clients, Outlook pushes down the current e-mail message content that you just read making the “e-mail trail” a sequence of message sent followed by an unlimited sequence of message replies in order by most recent on top, and least recent on the bottom. Thus the entire e-mail trail appears in each message sent or replied to without regard to the number of times this happens. To be sure to capture what you have sent after sending or replying to an e-mail message, you should go to the “Sent Items” folder, and open the message you just sent which should, unless you have changed the defaults, be the first message on the top of the list, and click on the smiley face icon which will cause the “Save E-Mail for” dialog box to appear so that you can save the e-mail message you just sent to the MyFile # it is associated with. By doing this after you have sent the message rather than before, the date time stamp along with the sender and list of recipient(s) will be made a part of the e-mail trail. The date time stamp could make a difference of win or loose at trial.

If you want to work around the delete process, you can do this easily by editing the subject line before clicking the “Send” button. Be sure to click on the floppy disk icon on the QAT before clicking “Send” to save your changes to the Subject line in the PST (Personal Storage Table) file that Outlook normally uses to save its information. All e-mail clients follow the same convention by prefixing the subject line with “Re:” for reply unless there is already a “Re:” from the last reply; i.e., somebody in the e-mail trail, which can contain multiple recipients, rereplied to a replyALL message. See how easy this is! And it gets easier. Any change to the Subject line using a character that is valid in filenames will cause the e-mail message to be saved to a different filename. Thus you can prefix/suffix the Subject line with 1,2,3, . . . n etc. etc. But before you do this you must look at what file name was used on the last successful save because if you don’t change the Subject line with the correct nth integer the file will still be overwritten. Good Luck! Aren’t computer programmers a perverted bunch of people?

Now test your work by:

1. Open any e-mail message in your Outlook “Inbox”. (Preferably one that has an attachment. A small PDF attachment file would be good.) by double clicking it.

2. Hover your mouse pointer over the smiley face icon that you added to the QAT as described above. Observe the small message that pops up in a think cloud near the smiley face icon.

3. Click or double click if necessary the smiley face icon you just added to the QAT of your Outlook Inspector window.

4. Enter the MyFile # that you obtained by previous research in the dialog box that appears. Click OK.

5. The e-mail message is saved as a MSG file stored in your “well defined directory structure”. If the response you get is the “. . . does not exist . . . ” message, you probably made a mistake defining the “path” in the Outlook macro. Which means that if you want this macro to work for you, you must go back in this procedure and do it over till you get it right. Restart in this procedure at the subtitle “Now we are going to edit the VBA subroutine SaveAsEmail2AutoSubrogate()“. As you follow this part of this procedure for the 2nd time; you are going to have to make your own decisions of exactly what to do by examining the “path”, using Windows (file) Explorer, as you originally defined it in the macro compared to how it really exists on you system; i.e., starting at the “letter” of your hard drive (C: or whatever is mapped to a share on your server) trace each subdirectory (folder) till you get to the folder that your e-mail message is going to be saved to; which will probably be named something like “E-Mail”. This may appear to be difficult, but compared to some of the cases I have read about that had really tangled relationships between parties, this is easy. Get started, and it ain’t over till you win.

6. Using Microsoft Windows (file) Explorer to navigate through your “well defined directory structure” to the MyFile # folder that you just saved the test e-mail message to.

7. Click or double click as needed on the E-Mail folder subordinate to the MyFile # folder to open it.

8. Verify that there is a file in the folder. The name of which is derived from the subject line in the e-mail message used to create the MSG file. Also, by right clicking the file icon; then left clicking the properties option in the popup menu that appears, verify the created and modified date time stamps on the file are consistent with the date and time you clicked the OK button.

9. Click or double click as needed the MSG file icon to open it.

10. Observer that the e-mail message you just opened exactly matches the one you were looking at by clicking on the e-mail message that is still in your Outlook e-mail Inbox.

11. If the MSG file being tested has an attachment, double click it and verify the file is opened by the correct Windows application program; e.g.: a PDF file should open in Adobe Reader; a DOC or DOCX file should open in MS-Word; a XLS or XLSM file should open in MS-Excel; etc., etc. When you are finished examining the attached file, please close it.

12. The MSG file is still open in the Outlook Inspector window. Note that at this point you can reply or forward this e-mail message as if you had opened it from the InBox in your own instance of Outlook even if you are not the user who stored the e-mail message as a MSG file in the first place. At this point you can verify this by replying to or forwarding the e-mail message at you discretion. When you are finished, close the Outlook Inspector window that has the open MSG file in it.

This macro subroutine exports a copy (with attachments imbedded in the MSG file) of your e-mail message without changing, deleting, moving, or doing anything else to your e-mail message in your Inbox. It leaves everything just like it was found. When you open the MSG file by double clicking it in Microsoft Windows (file) Explorer, the e-mail message you will find yourself looking at looks and behaves exactly as if you had opened it from your Outlook Inbox; i.e., You can respond to it or forward it as you wish; Or just close it when finished reading it. This is also true if the MSG file was opened by users other than yourself; i.e., you can share your e-mail messages with your associates assuming that the “well defined directory structure” is part of (stored in) a network “share” as described elsewhere in this procedure document.

CONCLUSION


THAT IS IT. Assuming that all tests pass, you are done. If some tests fail or you have problems getting to this point, I hope you will contact me. I will HELP you. Please recall that my offer of FREE assistance is to attorneys only or their bona fide representative as expressed in sub-paragraph “Qualifications for FREE assistance” above. My contact information is in my signature block below. My telephone number is conspicuously displayed on both my Professional and Personal websites. I have GoToMeeting software. So with your permission I can look over your shoulder while you are showing me what you are having a problem with. There is no charge for doing that. It’s FREE! So call me if you need me.

If all tests pass for you, and initial results look promising, or if initial results do not look promising (all feedback is valuable), I hope you will enter a comment by following this link (Link to post “Outlook Macro”). Lastly I want to say that this little project took me about twenty times as much time and text as I thought it would going into this thing. That is because as I wrote it I realized that I could not make assumptions about the skill level with Microsoft Windows on the part of the reader. So my goal evolved into making it both beneficial and enlightening for those who needed it. I hope you find this Outlook macro useful and that it makes you more efficient in the application of your time. If so, I hope you will share your new discovery with your friends who could benefit from knowing about it.

Peace be with us all. We sure as hell need it.

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Call Ted Palmer at (314) 994-1621

Ted Palmer
Professional Website: http://www.autosubrogate.com
Personal Website: http://www.tedpalmer.com
E-Mail Address: tedpalmer@autosubrogate.com
(If you are using web based e-mail (not Outlook or other e-mail client), you may want to use the Contact web page).

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